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Voiland College of Engineering and Architecture Engineering and Technology Management

New – Fall 2018

IT Project Management (E M 596)

 

Instructor

Kay Bachman, Ph.D.

3 Semester Credits, no prerequisites

Course Description and Objectives:

This course will provide theory and a solid understanding linked to industry best practices for successful managing of information technology projects. Course work will include: textbook readings, individual assignments, participation in pre-designed weekly discussion topics as well as integrating project management standard practices relevant to industry trends. Additionally, the student will practice application of project management concepts and processes based on the experiences realized by engaging in a team project.

Download the course syllabus here.

New – Fall 2018

Corporate Finance for Technical Managers (E M 596)

 

Instructor

Tim Cobb

3 Semester Credits, no prerequisites

Course Description and Objectives:

It is critical for engineering and technology managers to understand the “big picture”, and this requires understanding corporate finance.  To gain competitive advantage, organizations must link finance and strategy across the entire enterprise.  A solid understanding of finance, beyond the department/project level, enables technical managers to participate in strategic resource allocation and decision-making.  The way in which an organization raises capital, invests capital, and effectively manages capital, is fundamental to successfully achieving organizational goals.  This course will equip technical managers with the skills required to communicate and collaborate with the C-suite (CFO, COO, CEO) regarding “big picture” strategic financial planning and decision-making that creates value.

Hear from the course professor
Download the course syllabus here.

New – Fall 2018

Systems Architecting (E M 569)

 

Instructor

Alice Squires, Ph.D.

3 Semester Credits, no prerequisites

Course Description and Objectives:

A fundamental understanding of systems architecting is essential for today’s technological leaders to manage and lead complex interconnected sociotechnical system designs such as computer and information systems, command and control systems, space systems, transportation systems, agricultural systems, and health management systems, to name a few. System Architecting addresses the role of systems architecture and the systems architect, the system architecting process, and practical heuristics for developing robust, flexible system architectures. The course focuses inside the system solution boundary to develop operational, logical (functional), and physical architectures meeting defined system requirements that address customer needs and ultimately provide an optimal system design that addresses a well-defined problem or opportunity. Students will apply architectural principles and practices to the development of a system architecture that will provide insight to the linkages between stakeholder requirements and their translation to system requirements, early architectural decisions, and system deployment, operation and sustainment phases, and associated development, operation and support costs. Instructional methods will consist of lectures with interactive student participation, video presentations, guided online discussions, homework problems/review with quizzes, student team presentations, and a final individual project.

Visit the course webpage here.
Download the course syllabus here.

New – Spring 2018

Resourceful Leadership: An Introduction (E M 596)

 

Instructor

Hal Calbom, award-winning media producer, educator, publisher, and creative consultant.

3 Semester Credits, no prerequisites

Course Description and Objectives:

Successful engineers require more than technical skills. They are called upon to lead teams, communicate aspirations and results, facilitate problem solving spanning different disciplines, and manage complex processes. Today’s Engineering and Technology Management requires resourcefulness: the ability to work with large amounts of data and information, to facilitate multi-disciplinary teams across organizations, and  to effectively manage time, people, and financial resources.

Resourceful Leadership: An Introduction pushes students beyond the conventional boundaries of engineering and scientific inquiry: problem solving, critical thinking, engagement with others, personal and team development. Students will engage interactively: exploring case studies derived from contemporary business practice, developing techniques and practical capabilities, discussing and critiquing real-world exercises and demonstrations. There will be a strong emphasis on class interaction and participation.

Visit the course webpage here.
Download the course syllabus here.